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Hecate

Single colour (black) linocut
Hand printed on 110 g/sqm zerkall paper in pale cream with deckled edges.

30cm x 40cm image size.
Please note paper sizes will vary slightly but will generally have a minimum 3cm border around the printed image

Limited Edition of 25.

The moon is my mother. She is not sweet like Mary.
Her blue garments unloose small bats and owls.

Sylvia Path, Ariel

Hecate or Hekate (/ˈhɛk.ə.ti/; Ancient Greek: Ἑκάτη, Hekátē) is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown with a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She is variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, night, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.

Hecate was one of the main deities worshiped in Athenian households as a protective goddess and one who bestowed prosperity and daily blessings on the family.

Hecate was closely associated with plant lore and the concoction of medicines and poisons. In particular she was thought to give instruction in these closely related arts. Apollonius of Rhodes, in the Argonautica mentions that Medea was taught by Hecate, "I have mentioned to you before a certain young girl whom Hecate, daughter of Perses, has taught to work in drugs."

A number of other plants (often poisonous, medicinal and/or psychoactive) are associated with Hecate. These include aconite (also called hecateis),[49] belladonna, dittany, and mandrake. It has been suggested that the use of dogs for digging up mandrake is further corroboration of the association of this plant with Hecate; indeed, since at least as early as the 1st century CE, there are a number of attestations to the apparently widespread practice of using dogs to dig up plants associated with magic.

Image credit for sculpture: The Hecate Chiaramonti, a Roman sculpture of triple Hecate, after a Hellenistic original (Museo Chiaramonti, Vatican Museums)

£60.00

  • Image of Hecate
  • Image of Hecate
  • Image of Hecate
  • Image of Hecate